Indoor Cricket World - the Rules

The Rules


RULE 1. - FIELDING A TEAM
RULE 2. - THE GAME
RULE 3. - UNIFORMS
RULE 4. - THE TOSS
RULE 5. - PLAYING EQUIPMENT
RULE 6. - THE UMPIRE

RULE 7. - ARRIVAL/LATE PLAYER(S)
RULE 8. - PLAYER SHORT / SUBSTITUTES / INJURED PLAYERS
RULE 9. - FIELD PLACEMENT.
RULE 10. - PLAY BALL/LIVE BALL/DEAD BALL.
RULE 11. - SCORING.
RULE 12. - NO BALL.
RULE 13. - WIDE AND LEG SIDE WIDE BALLS.
RULE 14. - BOWLER CHANGING DIRECTION/STYLE.
RULE 15. - BALL LEAVING THE PLAYING AREA.
RULE 16. - APPEALS FOR DISMISSALS.
RULE 17. - DISMISSALS.
RULE 18. - INTERFERENCE.
RULE 19. - MISCONDUCT.
RULE 20. - ORDER OFF.
RULE 21. - ILLEGAL COURT ENTRY/EXIT.
RULE 22. - RUNNERS.
RULE 23. - END OF GAME.
RULE 24. - MIXED GAMES.

SECTION 2 - AICF STANDARDS

1. COURT LAYOUT AND DIMENSIONS.
2. EQUIPMENT.

SECTION 3 - MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES

1. GAME FEES.
2. LATE STARTS.
3. PREMIERSHIP AND BONUS POINTS.
4. LADDER POSITION.
5. FINALS QUALIFICATIONS.
6. DRAWN FINAL.

SECTION 4 - VARIATIONS.

SECTION 5 - UMPIRE SIGNALS.  

Umm . . out?


Can I use an Aluminium bat?

Well, it was (nearly) good enough for Dennis Lillee!! Read on for the Rules on exactly what equipment you can and can't use.

An analysis and explanation (where possible) of the Rules of Indoor Cricket


RULE 5. PLAYING EQUIPMENT

(these are the actual Rules . . . and here we have a discussion of the Playing Equipment, plus indoor cricket Equipment you should NEVER share . . . ever!

A. Bats: Bats must be made of wood, and be no larger than 96.5 cm in length and 10.8 cm in width. They must have a suitable bat grip. If an umpire is not satisfied with the suitability of a bat or bat grip, they should not allow it to be used. Note: Bat grips must be of a non-slip material and in good order - most centres offer new bat grips for sale, and will put them on on-site. Fans of Dennis Lillee can not use any of the left-over Aluminium bats that once made two very short, never-to-be-seen-again appearances in December, 1979 (first at the Gabba against the West Indies, and secondly, and most famously, 12 days later at the WACA in the first Test against England).

B. Batting Gloves: A batting glove must completely cover the hands, up to the wrist. A glove must be worn on both hands by each batter. An umpire must not allow play to continue until 2 gloves are worn. Time will be given for any batsman to put on suitable gloves. And if you aren't wearing "proper" outdoor-type batting gloves, you've never had a brand new indoor cricket ball smash into your fingers.

C. Wicket-Keeper's Gloves: The wicket keeper may wear none, 1 or 2 suitable gloves. They may be regular wicket- keeping or batting gloves, or a combination of both. Baseball style gloves etc are a concession to not being able to properly catch a ball, and are of course not permitted. The gloves in question may only be worn by the wicket keeper in the approved area [See Rule 9D - Wicket Keeper].

D. Fielder's Protection: Players may wear protective equipment when fielding. Elbow and knee pads, sporting helmets, face-guards, groin protectors and safety glasses are all permissible. Note: The "official" rules of the AICF seem to indicate fielders may wear gloves by including them in their list of permissible protective equipment. This is wrong - the wicket-keeper is the only fielder allowed to wear gloves. However, if a fielder had a compelling medical reason to wear some form of protective glove, the centre management would have to be approached before the game for approval, to avoid dissent amongst the players during the game.

E. Balls: All centres supply "recognised Indoor Cricket balls" for each match (they're easily recognised--they're the little spherical yellow bouncy things). Teams or players cannot of course supply their own. Any person or team found substituting, roughing-up, picking at the seam, or attempting to reshape the ball in any way will be penalised 10 runs for ball tampering. Shining the ball on clothing is the only acceptable "tampering" allowed.

F. Equipment not in immediate use (eg. gloves, elbow pads and protectors) must be placed outside the court until required - for example, some players put their box behind the non-striker's stumps as they prepare to bowl, and some wicket-keepers discard one glove and throw it into the corner of the court. This is not allowed. Players will be warned to remove unused protective equipment immediately. Should they refuse to do so (and I can think of no reason why they would refuse), they are to be penalised 5 runs.

G. In Australia, the Stumps are all "Wilkins" style collapsible stumps. They are either free-standing (almost universally) or bolted to the floor (which I think would be extremely dangerous). The base plate is considered to be part of the stumps, so a ball hitting the base plate, which results in the bails falling off, counts as a hit to the stumps.

H. Bails are wooden or plastic and are tied to the stumps, mainly to protect wicket-keepers from being hit in the face.

 

 

 

 

About Sheldon

Played since the earliest years, and began umpiring in the late 1970s.

Represented Western Australia for over 10 years in National Masters and Vets championships, honours include Captaining Western Australia and winning the Player of the National Championships in 1987.

Umpired State, National and international matches, held the post of Umpire Coordinator in Western Australia for the now defunct Australia Indoor Cricket Federation (AICF).

invited to officially photograph the Indoor Cricket World Cup in Wellington, New Zealand in 2002

invited to officially photograph the Indoor Cricket Masters and Under 18 World Cups in Christchurch, New Zealand in 2003

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