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RULE 12. NO BALL

  1. "No Ball" will be called when: 
    1. The ball is thrown, not bowled. With many indoor cricket players not having a background in outdoor cricket, suspect bowling actions are not uncommon. However, unlike the gutless International Cricket Commission, indoor cricket umpires are able to call "no ball" for throwing when it happens, not 3 months later. If the umpire is not totally satisfied with the fairness of the delivery, "No Ball" will be called at the moment of delivery. Note: to be deemed a legal delivery, the bowler's arm must not be straightened in the delivery action. If the elbow remains bent, to the same degree, throughout the delivery action, it's probably a fair delivery. This is a subtle but important distinction, and one not well understood by many players. The arm does not have to be straight ... but it cannot go from bent to straight (or vice versa) during the delivery action.
    2. Any part of the bowler's front foot is not grounded inside the return crease and behind the popping crease at the moment of delivery. (Note: Any part of the front foot on the line is a "No Ball"). Further discussion on this particular rule can be found in the Umpiring section.
    3. Any part of the ball, when bowled underarm, pitches on or before the underarm line. Self-explanatory ....
    4. There are more than 4 fielders in either half of the court at the commencement of the bowler's run up. [See Rule 9A - Field Placement]. Again, the Umpiring section contains some further discussion on this rule.
    5. The wicket keeper moves outside the 'keeper's designated area before the ball leaves the bowler's hand, or the 'keeper takes the ball in front or from the side of the stumps. [See Rule 9D(iv) and Rule 9D(viii)].
    6. A fielder, other than the wicket keeper, has any part of their body in the wicket keeper's area, the exclusion zone, or on the pitch, before the ball is played at by the striker or passes the striker's wickets. [See Rule 9D(i) and 9C - Field Placement]. "Any part of their body in" or "on" in this rule means over the defined area's edge. It does not have to be touching the ground in the defined area - just leaning over the exclusion zone or edge of the pitch etc, within the qualifications above, constitutes a breach of this rule. Players are not always aware of this important aspect of this rule.
    7. A bowler changes style of bowling (ie. overarm to underarm, left arm to right arm or vice versa) or changes which side of the wicket they are bowling from (ie. from over the wicket to around the wicket or vice versa) without first informing the umpire and receiving verbal and signalled acknowledgement from the umpire [See Rule 14]. This last condition is particularly important. If a bowler signals, but the umpire does not see it, that bowler is going to be particularly unimpressed if he gets a wicket but the umpire calls "no ball" for not indicating change of direction. It is therefore very important that umpires keep an eye on the game (discussed elsewhere) and, where a bowler indicates he did in fact indicate the change which the umpire failed to see, the bowler gets a full explanation of the need to gain verbal and signalled acknowledgement from the umpire. There are some tips related to this in the Umpiring section.
    8. The bowler depresses the net or any part of the netting's support structure in Zones D or C with any part of their body (usually their foot or back) during the course of their run up. This rule is usually transgressed by the bowler using the net to push-off, with their foot or back, at the beginning of their run-up.
    9. The ball, when bowled, passes over, or would have passed over, the striker's front shoulder, either on the full or bounce, when the striker is in a normal stationary batting stance. The rules define normal batting stance as the stance the batsman adopts at the time of the bowler's delivery stride, though umpires usually just make a judgement based on the height of the batsman and what would be considered a "normal" batting stance - it is asking a bit too much for the umpire to be looking at the bowler in his bowling stride and the stance of the batsman at the same time, although obviously peripheral vision can give some indication. This is regardless of the ball hitting the striker's bat or person. The striker must have part of their back foot behind the batting crease when the ball passes or would have passed the batting crease to be entitled to the call of "No Ball" in this case. The back foot need not be grounded behind the batting crease. Note: The umpire may regard an exaggerated batting stance in the crouched position as unfair play, unless of course that is the stance the batsman adopts every ball ... there are many styles in cricket, and even more in indoor cricket.
    10. Any part of the ball, when bowled, initially lands off the pitch before reaching the line of the batting crease. Questioning a number of umpires on this one, I have found a couple of different opinions on what the call should be if the ball initially lands on the pitch, but on its second or third bounce it lands off the pitch. Most state they would call "no ball", although the rules don't actually state this. I would suggest you ask your centre management or tournament management, if this situation is not more clearly stated in the applicable set of rules.
    11. A mankad is illegally attempted. The umpire will call "No Ball, Dead Ball". The ball will not count as part of the over and 2 runs will be added to the batting team's score. See Rule 17F(iii) for the definition of an illegal mankad attempt.
    12. A bowler makes more than 2 unsuccessful (but otherwise legal) mankad attempts in any one over - the 3rd unsuccessful attempt will be called "No Ball, Dead Ball". The ball will not be counted as part of the over and 2 runs will be credited to the batting team's score. [As in Rule 17F(iv)].
    13. The ball, after being bowled, hits the top or side net before reaching the batsman. Now, don't laugh. I have seen some very good indoor cricketers do this, having totally lost control of the ball. Always good for a laugh, as long as you're not the fielder who cops the ball in the back of the skull. The umpire, having no sense of humour, will call "No Ball, Dead Ball". The ball will not be rebowled and 2 runs will be credited to the batting team's score - as if the bowler's embarrassment isn't enough penalty.
    14. A fielder, or a permanently attached part of a fielder (with the exception of the bowler) moves onto or extends over the pitch from the commencement of the bowler's run up until the ball is played at by the striker or passes the striker's wickets. [See Rule 9B]
  2. A batter can be given "Out" off a "No Ball" in any of the following ways (detailed definitions can be found at the bracketed references): 
    1. If the ball is hit twice (other than to protect the wickets) [See Rule 17G(iii)].
    2. If either batsman deliberately interferes with the fielding team [See Rule 17G(ii)].
    3. If in attempting a run, either batter is run out [See Rule 17C(ii)].
    4. If the striker is run out by the wicket keeper [See Rule 17C(i(c))].
  3. Any batsman dismissed off a "No Ball" will be penalised the standard for any wicket, 5 runs. The 2 run bonus for the "No Ball" is cancelled-out by the dismissal.
    1. The AICF's rules still state that "A 'No Ball' is included as part of an over except in the last over of the innings". Many centres, if not most, now play this rule for the last over of each partnership, especially since the introduction of skins. AICF tournaments also play this rule for the last over of each partnership - it appears the AICF rulebook hasn't caught up with AICF practise.
    2. Any "No Ball" bowled in the last over of a partnership may be rebowled at the batter's discretion (again, the AICF's rules currently state "in the last over of an innings"). The umpire must ask the batsmen immediately if they want the ball to be rebowled. The batsmen must decide and inform the umpire before the next ball is bowled. Any penalties, runs or wickets resulting from the "No Ball" delivery will count regardless of whether the ball is rebowled or not. Umpire's tip: for some strange reason, many umpires feel compelled to announce at the beginning of the last over of each partnership "all no-balls, wides and leg-sides will be rebowled at the batsmen's discretion". Now just why they suffer this compulsion is beyond me. Why not announce at the beginning of each and every over "all instances of bowled, caught, run-out, stumped etc will cost the batting side five runs"? .. or "all wides, leg-sides and no-balls will score 2 runs for the batting side"? Silly.
    3. A "No Ball" incurs a penalty of 2 runs, which is added to the batting pair's score. Other runs scored off the no-ball by hitting any net zone and/or physical runs are also added to the score. For the purpose of individual player statistics, the score for a wide, no-ball etc is usually added to the score of the batsman who was on strike when it occured. Check your centre's standards on this one.

RULE 13. WIDE AND LEGSIDE WIDE BALLS

  1. A "Wide" will be called when: any part of the ball passes on the striker's off-side, outside the intersection of the batting crease and the edge of the pitch, without being touched by the striker's person or equipment. Any part of the ball passing on the line will be deemed "Wide". . . . . UNLESS ..... the markings of the court are not as they should be .... if the lines which defnine the edge of the pitch, at the batting crease, are as they should be, they are drawn OUTSIDE the edge of the pitch (i.e. the inside edge of the line is on the actual edge of the pitch). Therefore, any ball pitching on the line is obviously outside the edge of the pitch. However, if the lines are incorrectly drawn (and I have seen this in some centres) they can be set up so that the OUTSIDE edge of these lines is on the actual edge of the pitch. Therefore, a ball landing square on the line would clearly be inside the edge of the pitch, and should not be called "wide".
    This should not be confused with a ball landing on the edge of the pitch .... these comments are related to the thick lines which are almost always drawn on the edge of the pitch, at the striker's end, to help the umpire determine the position of the edge of the pitch. Of course, if all centres marked their courts as they should, there would be no room for such annoying little variances.
  2. A "Legside" will be called when: any part of the ball passes outside the intersection of the batting crease and the legside line without being touched by the striker's person or equipment. NOTE: A ball passing between the batsman (in other words, in front of the batsman) and the stumps is not a legside wide, even if it is well outside the leg-side line - this can occur if a batsman steps way back toward 'leg', he can be outside the legside line, so a ball passing in front of him can also be outside the legside line.
    Any part of the ball passing on the line, at the defined intersection, will be deemed "Legside".
  3. For the purpose of identification, the edge of the pitch will be taken as the offside line (notwithstanding the comments above re: the placement of that line), and the point 45cm from the centre stump will be taken as the legside line.
  4. The AICF rules state that a "batsman may be dismissed by all forms of dismissal when a "Wide" is bowled, bearing in mind that if a ball is struck by the striker's person or equipment, it is no longer a 'Wide' ". Hmmm, I know what they mean, but ......
  5. A batsman dismissed off a "Wide" will be penalised the standard 5 runs, as for any wicket lost. The 2 run bonus for the wide is cancelled-out by the dismissal.
  6. A "Wide" counts as part of the over, except in the last over of each partnership (or "either innings" if you still want to believe the outdated AICF rules).
  7. All "Wides" bowled in the last over of a partnership (or innings blah blah AICF blah blah) may be rebowled at the batsmen's discretion. The umpire must immediately ask the batsmen if the ball is to be rebowled, and the batsmen must decide and inform the umpire before the next delivery is bowled. All scores, penalties or wickets from the "Wide" or "Legside" delivery will count regardless of whether the ball is rebowled or not. Umpire's and player's note: the reverse also applies ... all wides, no-balls and leg-sides will be rebowled if the batsmen so desire, whether a wicket fell off them or not. Many players and umpires assume that, because a wicket fell off the no-ball (or wide etc), it should not be offered to the batsmen to be rebowled. This is an incorrect assumption.
  8. The penalty for a "Wide" is 2 runs, which will be added to the batting pair's score, plus any physical runs scored.

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